Things I Learned in My Surgical Term

I have avoided writing about my surgical term until now (re: I have been too lazy lately to post much to my blog). It was a time of stress, a time of dread just thinking about work, and a whole lot of hard work with very little appreciation of the efforts put in at work.

Here are 5 of the things I learned about surgery during my rotation:

1. The consultant will blame you for things not going smoothly (read: the consultants are control freaks)

One particular patient seen during the ward round, was only being kept in because of his rising LFTs following a cholecystectomy. If his LFTs were fine, he could go home. The consultant decided to blast me vigorously about my lack of proactiveness in not asking the 6am phlebotomy blood rounds to have taken bloods from this patient so that we could discharge them during the ward round. The only problem: there are no 6 am phlebotomy ward rounds, only the 8 am rounds, and by the time they get to the surgical ward, it’s not till at least 9 am. Conclusion: my consultant is a control freak, and terribly clueless about the hospital schedules.

2. Hard work goes largely unappreciated. It’s all about results at the end of the day.

Despite us interns constantly working 2 hours overtime each day, some of us were told that we treated our jobs like a “9-4” job. We were also slagged for how little discharge summaries we were doing (since we were way too busy with lion’s share of ward work), yet the registrars got more discharge summaries done (the overnight registrar usually has a bunch of time to do them).

3. A met call on surgery doesn’t get you any senior staff – you’re pretty much on your own

My first met call ever was in surgery, after a patient’s legs gave way. Only 3 nurses and another intern attended the met call. Registrars and consultants were no where in sight. Fortunately the incident was fairly minor with only some torn skin (ouch).

4. The sickest patients should be looked after by the least experienced (interns)

Surgical patients are some of the sickest patients in the hospital. Most are elderly, with several comorbidities, and who have gone through some extreme surgery starting with “radical” and ending with -ectomy (ie a major major operation). Subsequently, nurses would constantly be asking interns to review patient A or patient B because of fevers, reduced urine output, high blood pressure etc. Being interns of course, we had hardly any experience with these patients, yet were expected to deal with them. Registrars were no where in sight again (see 3).

5. It’s teach yourself surgery.

Not once did any registrar sit down to properly explain about why we are managing patient A with such a management plan. We had to figure everything out ourselves by reading, and by experience. Asking questions were met with raised eyebrows and judgemental questioning of  “shouldn’t you have learned that in medical school already?”. The worse thing: registrars claiming how much you learnt at the end of the rotation due to their excellent teaching.

So there you go. A list of 5 things that surgery taught me. May I never have to repeat that again.

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4 thoughts on “Things I Learned in My Surgical Term

  1. I can see how this could be a very vicious circles. People sticking to it by managing “on their own” and then not trying to pass on the knowledge because, if they managed on their own, why can’t other people do to? What a shame.

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    1. I can assure you, that I wouldn’t be adopting such a mindset, because I know how horrible the experience of managing “on my own” was and so I wouldn’t wish it upon others. And I don’t feel that the registrars avoided teaching because they weren’t taught. It was more to do with they were too busy to, and perhaps their expectations were a tad bit high.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Urgh. I hated my surgery rotation in med school and I am trying very hard to have a good attitude about surgery during internship, but I am not looking forward to it. It seems to have a really crappy reputation everywhere! Your list is so very true. Glad you made it out alive 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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