First Day

So I can happily say that I survived my first day of being a GP registrar. I stayed back late too, and I wasn’t actually grumpy about that, unlike being in a hospital rotation. Which I thought was quite unusual actually.

After an awesome 2 days at an island resort attending official orientation with the GP training organization, I was a little apprehensive about starting today. Thoughts filled me with dread about what to do with the extremely difficult patient. What if the patient doesn’t like me? What if I bother my supervisor too much? What if I forgot to do a critical investigation?

So I went in this morning to the practice, all tensed up and nervous. I got the software training, and had a tour of the place. Can’t believe there is a CT scanner downstairs at the practice!

And when I got around to seeing my first patient, it wasn’t actually so bad. Having experienced ED at the hospital, the patients there had been very unwell, and it always felt like I was waiting for a consultant, and constantly waiting for someone to make a decision because I wasn’t experienced to make that call. And if patient’s had built up, the whole department got stressed, with team leaders pretty much yelling if you were too slow.

I didn’t experience any of that today fortunately. And the patients I saw were pretty lovely to be honest (which I guess I wasn’t really expecting working in a low socioeconomic status suburb).

My very first patient – menorrhagia after going off the implanon. This has been for 2 years since removal of the implanon. Should I put her on the pill, or should I refer her? When is the normal time frame after implanon removal when patient should have regular period again? All this I didn’t know, so asking the supervisor, he advised that I should refer her. And to do a speculum, since last one was done about 1 year ago when she had her pap smear.

And at the end of the day, I have a list of stuff I need to look up in more detail to fill my gaps in knowledge. Things like implanon contraception, hypertension management and investigations, and tinnitus.

My supervisor later told me how specialists would be well gunned for complex and really heavy illnesses, but for common things, would have no clue how to approach. He shared the example of a paeds consultant not knowing how to manage a child with VSD who got a simple finger laceration. The patient got stitched, and given gentamicin (which is overkill). But hey, in general practice, a good GP knows how to manage simple problems, and if its out of their scope or requires specialist intervention, a referral is appropriate.

In a way, that’s why I chose general practice. A specialist is excellent in their field of specialty, but for other things – they have no idea how to treat. A GP knows how to manage basic conditions for almost everything, but not to levels of expertise like a specialist. But for things like a rash or bump/lump, I can imagine the cardiologist telling a patient to “go and see the GP”.

Having worked in the hospital for the past 3 years, I can say that the first day of any of my rotations have not been as satisfying and bringing content as general practice.

The Last Day of Hospital

Today was officially the last day of hospital. I was doing the dreaded postnatal checks (which I have done usually on Saturday, and those were busy as ever), so imagine my surprise when I went in today to find only 9 postnatal discharges (I have usually had to do 14- 18, with many ward call jobs as well in between).

By 12 noon, I had managed to see all my patients. Best day ever I must say. It has never happened before, and I am so glad that it happened on my last day of hospital.

Even the PAOU (pregnancy assessment and observation unit) was “quiet”, so they didn’t really need the help I offered them. So, I ended up spending 5 hours doing something productive like reading up stuff on medicare (prior to my orientation tomorrow), and some stuff on hypertension.

Also, today was a really nice day. Last few days have been muggy days with 33 degree temperatures. Today was a nice 27 degrees. Very pleasant.

Looking back at my 3 years in hospital, I can say that I’ve come a fair way. But being in training as of tomorrow, I have even more to go. Hospital time was stressful at times, but I can certainly say that I have learned a lot from it, and I am grateful to my patients, to my colleagues and the to the registrars and consultants who gave me great support and educational opportunities.

Before I left the hospital, I posted some internal mail to “Human Resources” with my ID badge, parking card and a letter written on a progress note.

“Dear Human Resources,

Please find enclosed my ID badge and car parking card.

I have had a wonderful time working here at the hospital.

Kind regards

The Placebo Effect

 

I dropped it off at the internal mails box, to never see my name badge ever again.

Leaving the hospital, I crossed the street, before deciding that I needed to take a photo of the hospital entrance, and so went back. Just like my last regional hospital, I don’t know when I’ll be passing the entrance again.

I race off to catch my bus, thinking that this is the last bus ride back home from the hospital. A nice finish to the day, and a nice finish to the last day in hospital. I need to pack my stuff up for tomorrow for…┬áThe start of orientation as a general practice registrar

Last Week

Having spent close to 3 years in the hospital system, I have just one more week before I permanently leave.

General practice here I come!

But honestly, these past 3 years have been challenging, rewarding, and I must say I have come a fair way from being a medical student.

In 1 weeks time, I am no longer a resident anymore. I’ll be thrust into the world of general practice, where almost anything is fair game. I’ll be a registrar, and that means being thrown in the deep end.

One more week of obstetrics and gynaecology. I don’t think I’ll miss the postnatal checks, because they were very mundane. But I suppose I will miss scrubbing in for cases. Next week will be the last time probably I scrub in to assist an operation again.

Much work lies ahead… Hopefully I’ll be ready for it!